Project Frame shapes and sizes

Vertical and horizontal frames

The same scene was photographed twice. Each scene was photographed in the vertical and then again in the horizontal format.  Most scenes have worked in both formats although some are restricted in the second horizontal choice. Certainly I felt during the process that format is a matter of habit but it was an interesting exercise exploring the options.

I visited Brodie castle and its grounds for this ‘shoot’. There has been a castle on this site since 1567 but was destroyed by fire in 1645. It was expanded in 1824 to a large mansion house and is designed in the Scots Baronial style. It is now owned by the National Trust of Scotland.

Both formats of this entrance display are acceptable although the latter horizontal is the preference due to the depth of the wall.

This 9th century Pictish stone was found in a local churchyard in 1782. The horizontal format works better due to the width of the display fence surrounding the stone.

Both formats of Brodie Castle are acceptable, each offering different perspectives. The vertical image allows the eye to be drawn up the long driveway whereas the horizontal emphasises its imposing structure.
In this view of the castle the vertical is the only one that works. I tried to capture the baronial tower with the flag but the horizontal perspective does not capture the image correctly.
Here both formats are acceptable with the large tree masking the castle being a prominent feature in both.
My preference here is for the horizontal which best captures the depth of the building.
The long avenue of trees is accentuated well in the latter format and is not really seen to its best in the former.
With this unusual tree trunk I feel both offer advantages although in most eyes this is no doubt a personal impression what works best.
This exercise has emphasised that with a little experimentation prior to shooting the vertical format will work just as well in a number of cases.
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